The bespoke process begins with our clients discussing their sartorial needs and wishes with one of our tailors. They will advise on appropriate clothing and function and assist in selecting suitable cloths from our extensive range of patterns and linings. After that, the actual tailoring starts. Below are the eight steps we take to turn your wishes into a perfect garment.

  1. Measurements:  When the cut and the style of the garment are agreed over 27 measures and configurations are noted.  

1. Measurements: When the cut and the style of the garment are agreed over 27 measures and configurations are noted.
 

  2. Drafting a Pattern:  After the cutter has drafted the individual’s pattern, it is then cut out and chalked onto the cloth.  

2. Drafting a Pattern: After the cutter has drafted the individual’s pattern, it is then cut out and chalked onto the cloth.
 

  3. Cutting the Cloth:  Follows on from the pattern being chalked onto the fabric. Each part of the pattern laid in order to ensure that checks and stripes will neatly line up.

3. Cutting the Cloth: Follows on from the pattern being chalked onto the fabric. Each part of the pattern laid in order to ensure that checks and stripes will neatly line up.

  4. Trimmings:  After cutting, the linings, pocketing, canvasses, buttons and other parts of the garments are put together with the cloth in preparation for making.

4. Trimmings: After cutting, the linings, pocketing, canvasses, buttons and other parts of the garments are put together with the cloth in preparation for making.


  5. The Baste:  When individual parts of the coat (jacket) are sewn together ready for the first fitting.   

5. The Baste: When individual parts of the coat (jacket) are sewn together ready for the first fitting.

 

  6. Alterations:  A new pattern is cut, accounting for any alterations noted in the first fitting. The baste is then ripped down, remarked using the new pattern, and re-cut.

6. Alterations: A new pattern is cut, accounting for any alterations noted in the first fitting. The baste is then ripped down, remarked using the new pattern, and re-cut.

  7. Forward construction: Structural work is carried out on the coat by the tailor in preparation for the second fitting.

7. Forward construction:Structural work is carried out on the coat by the tailor in preparation for the second fitting.

  8. After the second fitting:  Further alterations are made and the garment is finished and pressed. Button holes, felling and edge stitching are completed, all by hand. The coat is then pressed before the last fitting. Clothing is then pressed a final time before delivery.

8. After the second fitting: Further alterations are made and the garment is finished and pressed. Button holes, felling and edge stitching are completed, all by hand. The coat is then pressed before the last fitting. Clothing is then pressed a final time before delivery.


The construction of your suit: Full Canvas, Half Canvas, fused, unlined, deconstructed or different?

De Oost Bespoke Tailoring is a house of craft and passion so we can tailor using several ways of construction. This is a short explanation about the 4 common methods used by Bespoke Tailors.

 

Full Canvas Jackets

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Traditionally, men’s suits were constructed with a layer of horsehair canvas underneath the wool fabric shell. This canvas holds the shape of the suit and keeps it from sagging or deforming, much like the foundation of a house keeps it upright. The canvas is cut to the jacket’s shape, then the wool is stitched to the canvas. Over time, as you wear the jacket, the canvas conforms to your body’s shape, creating an excellent fit.
The canvas lining allows the suit fabric to drape naturally, allowing a clean, well put-together look. It takes years of training and additional hours of handwork for a tailor to be able to craft this the correct way.

Half Canvas Jackets

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Between the two extremes (fused and full canvas) lies a compromise – the half-canvassed jacket. Half-canvassed jackets have canvas material running only through the chest and lapels of the coat. Past that point, the jacket is fused.

Half-canvassed jackets have several benefits. First, they generally have a lower price than a similar fully canvassed jacket. Less handcraft means a lower overall cost to you. And because the top half of the jacket is not fused you’ll not run into any bubbling problems as you might in a fused jacket. This adds to the lifespan of the garment. Finally, the canvassing provides the proper base for the jacket to drape naturally across your chest, rather than appearing stiff and lifeless as many fused jackets do.

Unlined - Unstructured Jackets

When your suits aren't just for business and formal occasions then having them tailored Unlined or Unstructured is a good option. It gives the wearer the most natural look and freedom of personal expression.

By removing the interior lining, shoulder pads, and the canvassing, the jacket wears more like a shirt than a suit coat. This allows for more movement - comfort, a more casual appearance, and a more natural silhouette for the wearer - all of which help bringing the jacket down to the less formal level of the wardrobe. More often than not it is seen on lighter, summer-weight fabrics. Part of it because lighter weights of wool and materials like cotton and linen are more prone to wrinkle in the first place, another reason is that by removing the lining it allows the jacket to wear much cooler. Natural fibers breath but this is obstructed by the satin lining, even a light-weight jacket with a full-canvas construction wears much warmer in the summer.

Deconstructed - Fused Jackets

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Many suit manufacturers no longer use a canvas interlining in their jackets. Rather, a fusible interlining is glued to the wool shell of the suit. And while this does an adequate job of keeping a jacket’s shape, it often creates an unnatural stiffness in the jacket, making a fused jacket appear lifeless compared to a similar canvassed coat.

What is sometimes problematic with fused jackets is the fact that the glue degrades over time, or may come unstuck during the dry-cleaning/pressing process. Where the wool detaches from the fused backing, the fabric ripples around the chest and lapels, a phenomenon known as “bubbling.”

Differences: In the full canvas Jacket, you can see how the jacket is composed entirely of cloth and horsehair canvas. The fabric is stitched directly to the canvas. In a half-canvassed garment, fusible extends the entire length of the coat. However, the garment is stitched to the canvas material, assisting in the proper shaping and providing life to the coat. In the fused jacket all the way to the right, the fusible interlining is glued the entire length of the coat.

If you want to know what the best construction would be for your garments and your personal style needs/ideas? Then feel free to contacts us for personal advice.

Bespoke Tailoring is so much more then a method. It is about passion, respect and creating a unique experience. This so you look and feel as you wish and prefer.